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On the Second Day of the Holidays a Counterfeiter Gave to Meee…

On the Second Day of the Holidays a Counterfeiter Gave to Meee…

Two Video Games
Something sure to top many children’s holiday wish-lists will be the latest and greatest video games. While some may be for educational purposes and most are for entertainment, kids (and adult kids) will be chomping at the bit to get immersed in the state-of-the art fantasy lands these games create.
However, as one recent news investigation in Corpus Christi reveals, “even with new, high-tech systems, old problems are surfacing.”
The mushrooming of counterfeit and pirated video games is sure to wipe the joy off of many young faces who will inevitably wonder if, in fact, they would be better off with a lump of coal.
At best, pirated video games malfunction, skip, or fail any kind of quality check. At worst, these games can ruin Christmas, damage expensive systems, or even sabotage chances for new innovative entertainment.
Just two weeks ago, the game “Battle Dungeon” was scrappedafter only one week on the market due to rampant piracy “overwhelming” its developers. Servers were overloaded with users who used illicit copies of the game, with 90% of traffic stemming from pirated copies. This isn’t just a loss for those who spent their time and resources developing the game and the infrastructure around it, but it’s also a loss for gamers who won’t get a chance to experience this kind of innovative entertainment.
These developers and entertainment companies are also feeling the blowback from upset customers who were snookered into purchasing the pirated version, oftentimes online. Stores, like Play Again Classic Video Games in Corpus Christi, have seen plenty of distressed customers seeking assistance with their now ruined gaming consuls, thanks to overworked lasers which are expensive to replace.
To avoid scrooging your holiday, experts suggest you purchase your products from a trustworthy retailer, scrutinize packaging like fonts and markings or paper type of the cover, and always trust your instincts: if it’s too good to be true, it probably is.
For more information on how to avoid counterfeit and pirated goods, please visit www.DangerousFakes.com.

Image from iStock