Global Intellectual Property Center

Tag Archives: GIPC Events

What You’re Reading: GIPC’s Most Popular Posts of 2012

What You’re Reading: GIPC’s Most Popular Posts of 2012

As we conduct our obligatory reflections today, it is clear that 2012 was a big year for intellectual property and the GIPC. From the release of our IP Creates Jobs state-IP jobs study to the launch of our wildly successful international multimedia platform IP Delivers, GIPC’s work as champions for innovators and creators in 2012 makes us very excited for what’s to come in 2013. And believe us, there’s plenty to come.

GIPC Hosts 6th Annual USPTO IP Attaché Program

GIPC Hosts 6th Annual USPTO IP Attaché Program

This week, U.S. Government intellectual property (IP) ambassadors working around the world convened at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to discuss the state of play of IP rights in emerging economies.

The event, GIPC’s 6th Annual USPTO IP Attaché Roundtable, featured remarks from eight United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) IP attachés stationed in Brazil, China, Geneva, India, Mexico, Russia, and Thailand.

Fake Airbags and Cough Drops and Car Seats—Oh, My!

Fake Airbags and Cough Drops and Car Seats—Oh, My!

Would you notice if your cough drops are fake? Or if your extension cord wasn’t genuine? Or if your contact lenses were counterfeit?

The GIPC stopped people in New York’s Times Square to see if they could spot counterfeit goods. In the final installment of the “Dangerous Fakes” series, see just how hard it is to decide between real and fake.

Five Years of Intellectual Property Advocacy

Five Years of Intellectual Property Advocacy

“If we lose our ability to create, innovate, and generate the best artistic, technological, and knowledge-based IP, then our economic formula for success in the global economy will fail.”

          Thomas J. Donohue, President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce. 10/3/2007

Dangerous Fakes You Wouldn’t Want to Run Into

Dangerous Fakes You Wouldn’t Want to Run Into

By Trinh Nguyen

When it comes to the products people rely on every day, can you spot a fake? Recently, the Global Intellectual Property Center presented real and counterfeit items to consumers in Times Square to see if they could tell the difference. Here’s how one woman from Texas faired:

 

Criminals see the production and sale of counterfeit goods as a lucrative, low-risk business model to make money and undermine businesses in almost every industry imaginable. Counterfeiting and piracy have grown to cost the global economy a whopping $650 billion each year. While this illicit activity hacks away at U.S. businesses and jobs, it also puts American consumers at risk.