Global Intellectual Property Center

Tag Archives: TPP

U.S. Chamber Reiterates Importance of Twelve Years Data Protection for Biologics in TPP

U.S. Chamber Reiterates Importance of Twelve Years Data Protection for Biologics in TPP

By Patrick Kilbride Let’s be clear:  Government negotiators will determine the final terms of a TPP agreement.  From an industry perspective, the term of data protection for biologics in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement should be 12 years, consistent with U.S. law.  Anything less risks the support of U.S. industry. As negotiators arrive in Maui, […]

Innovation in the Life Science Community Through Trade

Innovation in the Life Science Community Through Trade

Photographer: Balint Porneczi/Bloomberg

By Mark Elliot NOTE: This entry originally appeared in the BIO Show Daily on Thursday, June 18, 2015, distributed at the 2015 BIO International Convention. This is a unique time for trade policy in the United States. A renewal of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), an absolute requirement for any U.S. president to negotiate a trade agreement, is being debated in […]

Trading Up: The Evolution and Implementation of Intellectual Property Rights in U.S. Free Trade Agreements

Trading Up: The Evolution and Implementation of Intellectual Property Rights in U.S. Free Trade Agreements

Trading Up Cover 228x300Intellectual property (IP) is a critical driver of economic growth and the development of new ideas, technologies, and solutions globally. The increasing importance of IP in a global economy was recognized and advanced with the successful negotiation of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). Concluded almost 20 years ago, TRIPS established an important global baseline of IP protection and enforcement.

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State Elected Officials Stand United on IP

State Elected Officials Stand United on IP

© Niyazz

These days, it’s not too often that legislators agree on policy, much less actually stand united to pass something. But that was the case this year when the “big three” state elected official groups passed resolutions supporting innovation and intellectual property (IP) rights.